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That is a big Catapult!

I got an email from a web visitor (Jerry Miller) He has made a very big and very spectacular catapult. He based this project on my Wyvern torsion catapult. And while it fires pretty strongly and has a lot of power he is looking to improve the distance of the throw.

He gives us some information on building this catapult and what he has done with it. Check out the pictures and informatio and if you can offer some advice and tips on how to improve this monster be sure to

 

 

 

 

 

First let's take a look at the catapult in its current state.

The finished catapult

 

First attempt. 10ft long x 4ft wide. 4x4,construction. 9ft throwing arm.  Main down fall was not enough rope (100ft) couldn't fit anymore through the hole without compromising the 4x4. Also believe it or not 3/4in black iron pipe was not strong enough for tightening the rope. I was amazed at the amount strength. You will see the bow in the boards and the rope crushed the throwing arm.

The first version

Tension has bent the bar

The rope wrapping

The tension has destroyed the beam

 

Okay! On to Stage 2 - Our Siege Engineer made a lot of changes to improve this catapult including adding a winch to wind it up. Lot of torque on that swing arm!

NextContinue

 

 

 

The Art of the Catapult: Build Greek Ballistae, Roman Onagers, English Trebuchets, and More Ancient Artillery

Whether playing at defending their own castle or simply chucking pumpkins over a fence, wannabe marauders and tinkerers will become fast acquainted with Ludgar, the War Wolf, Ill Neighbor, Cabulus, and the Wild Donkey-ancient artillery devices known commonly as catapults. Building these simple yet sophisticated machines introduces fundamentals of math and physics using levers, force, torsion, tension, and traction. Instructions and diagrams illustrate how to build seven authentic working model catapults, including an early Greek ballista, a Roman onager, and the apex of catapult technology, the English trebuchet. Additional projects include learning how to lash and make rope and how to construct and use a hand sling and a staff sling. The colorful history of siege warfare is explored through the stories of Alexander the Great and his battle of Tyre; Saladin, Richard the Lionheart, and the Third Crusade; pirate-turned-soldier John Crabbe and his ship-mounted catapults; and Edward I of England and his battle against the Scots at Stirling Castle.

 


 

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